What should be in mind as you are about to pick the best lens for Canon 80D?

For a camera, a lens is always pretty important. It decides by what way you capture images and how good their quality will be. The case of Canon 80D is also not an exception. Whenever you want to buy a new lens, do not forget to consider about sharpness, authenticity, durability, and so forth. Followings are some guideline for you, both amateur and professional ones to own the best lenses for Canon 80D.

Photo taken by Canon 80D with 42mm ƒ/9.0 lens

Perspective

Let’s imagine that you are standing on a busy street corner. Then you take ten pictures with 9mm, 24mm, 50mm, 200mm and 500mm lenses in turn. Photos from each group of the lens will show different things.

As for the 9mm one, it is possible for you to get a panoramic view of roads, people, vehicles, homes along with sky. In case of narrowing the scene a little bit with a 24-mm lens, the story will be changed. The sky will be surely out of the photoshoot and give room for streets and may be vice versa.

If you plan to have pictures with a specific theme such as one person or car, for example, the lens of 50mm is ideal enough. On the other hand, it is not as suitable as the 200mm one when shooting a photo of details.

Maximum aperture

A common multipurpose zooming lens on good-quality DSLRs must provide medium-to-far-ranging perspective. But these lenses often have narrow maximum apertures like f/3.5-5.6.

What does it mean? Let’s take a 18mm-wide-angle setting, a maximum aperture of f/3.5 as an instance. At this, most of the light is transferred by the lens to the image sensor on your camera. By the time you zoom to 55mm, your lens will have very little light at the aperture of f/5.6. Each f-stop (f/4, f5.6, f/8) equals an ISO setting (ISO 400, 600, 1600). So if you have got a f/4 lens instead of f/5.6, it is good to reduce the ISO from 1600 to 800.

When shooting in the low light conditions with a zooming set, you will have to enhance the light through the lens by increasing the ISO (for example, from ISO 400 to 800 to make the camera more sensitive to light). In other cases, the flash can be in use to add more light or slow down the shutter speed (for example, from 1/60 second to 1/30 second. Hence, more light is sent to the sensor. If you add a lighter lens to your kit, such as a 50mm f/1.8 lens, you will not need to change the ISO or a regular flash.

Size and weight

Maximum aperture also affects the size and weight of the lens. In fact, a large aperture lens will naturally have a big size/weight. For instance, a Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 professional lens weighs a mere 1.5kg while the f/4 is a half light, only 0.75kg.

The same is true of wide-angle lenses and fixed focal length lenses. A 17-40mm f/4 wide-angle lens is measured 0.47kg, in comparison with a 0.63kg of a 16-35mm f/2.8 lens. And a Sigma 50mm f/1.4 lens is significantly heavier than a Canon 50mm f/1.8 lens.

It is not true that only maximum aperture can influence the size and weight of the lens. Professional and solid structure plays a role as well. The Canon 50mm f/1.8 lens mentioned above is a common device with a plastic structure while the Sigma f/1.4 one is featured by a metal frame.

Are you a traveling and photographing enthusiast in the good light? If the answer is yes, why don’t  you try to choose a lighter weight but narrow aperture zooming lens? The Canon 55-250mm EF-S lens weighs less than 0.5kg with a low cost. Whereas professional lenses 70-200mm f/2.8 is three times heavier with a high price.

Stability

Photo taken by Canon 80D with 18mm ƒ/8.0 lens

Actually, when your photography love is for a Canon, Nikon, or Panasonic camera, there is advice for you. A lens with image stabilization is in need to compensate the camera shake thank to its outstanding technology feature. Canon, Nikon, and Panasonic own the optical stabilization technology by integrating into the lens. Olympus and Pentax are different. They have built-in stability into the camera, so you can take advantage of this technology regardless of the type of lens that you attach to the camera.

Although lenses with image stabilization are more expensive, you still should buy them for cameras. Such point is especially useful if you want to take a picture in zooming, remote or telephoto. Canon 70-200mm f/4 IS (image-stabilized) professional lenses are more expensive than models with no IS option. The price difference is too high but it enables users to capture images with high sharpness in diverse lighting conditions.

Attraction

The next note may be slightly sensitive, highly biased towards personal feelings. But buying a lens that you desire in comparison with one that you think you should buy is an important factor. A lens which you stick with is attractive to you at first sight. Let’s pick. Somehow, what you think is great will inspire you when you take pictures.

All elements together

A new lens means a new inspiration for the photograph passion. Photographers tend to like their cameras but love their lenses. Whenever deciding to buy a new lens, these five notes will help you to narrow down the list of your favorite candidates. Think about the types of photos you want to capture, the brightness conditions where you will be using the lenses and the weight/size that you are ready to carry.

Once you have only short list of potential ones, you will need to read, evaluate, study the specifications and reconcile the budget you have. Finally, choose the lens you want to buy the most from the rest of the contestants and start enjoying the results by taking beautiful pictures.

So, Canon 80D is not a bad idea for any photographer. But its charm will be in an increase with a great lens. Then, it is time to enjoy, not only picking photos, making videos with this as if the best slow motion camera in the world, but also admiring art works by your own.

Mobile technology will change the way we go out for camping

Can you relate to this scenario?

You’re running late for your first morning appointment, rushing to fill your travel mug and you almost forget your phone. Laptop bag slung over one shoulder; travel mug in hand; and some loose papers in your other hand (now thinking you should’ve put those into your laptop bag).

Oh yeah, you almost forgot the samples and brochures for the day. They’re still in your supply closet! And then you’re running back inside the house to grab them. You finally race out of your driveway – smoke show and all.

You turn on the radio, relying on the radio DJs to ease you into the day. It’s a little too early to call most of your customers right now -maybe in another half hour.

The time flies by and you arrive at your first appointment. It goes way better than you thought it would and you have a bunch of stuff to follow-up on, as well as a couple more business cards to add to your Contacts. And so the day goes – some good calls, some rough ones, and seemingly non-stop phone calls in between. Remember to bring some best police flashlight and best spyderco knife when you going out.

You’re scribbling notes on whatever pieces of paper you can reach. You tell yourself “put this someplace you won’t lose it.” The phone rings again. It’s one of your good customers and you need pull over to take an order from him because he insists on calling you rather than your inside CSR. You pull out your notepad for that and spend the next 20 minutes in a parking lot when you could’ve been driving to your next prospect.

Business cards are stacking up in your cup holder. But you’ll just enter them at the end of the day when you get home.

You don’t have much time to stop anywhere for decent food, so you hit a drive-thru. And since you’re still running behind, you decide to eat while you drive. While fumbling with the burger wrapper, a ketchup- and mayo-covered onion falls between your seat and the center console. And there go a couple of fries, too. You tell yourself not to forget to look for and throw that stuff away later (but you probably forget). At least it didn’t hit your shirt this time.

Emails and texts stream in during the whole day. And of course, more phone calls.

And wait – that company you just passed looks like a great prospect! You scribble the company name on another piece of paper and tell yourself not to lose it (but you probably do).

Flash forward to the end of the day. You’re this someplace you won’t lose it.” The phone rings again. It’s one of your good customers and you need pull over to take an order from him because he insists on calling you rather than your inside CSR.

You pull out your notepad for that and spend the next 20 minutes in a parking lot when you could’ve been driving to your next prospect.

Business cards are stacking up in your cup holder. But you’ll just enter them at the end of the day when you get home.

You don’t have much time to stop anywhere for decent food, so you hit a drive-thru. And since you’re still running behind, you decide to eat while you drive.

While fumbling with the burger wrapper, a ketchup- and mayo-covered onion falls between your seat and the center console. And there go a couple of fries, too. You tell yourself not to forget to look for and throw that stuff away later (but you probably forget). At least it didn’t hit your shirt this time.

Emails and texts stream in during the whole day. And of course, more phone calls.

And wait – that company you just passed looks like a great prospect! You scribble the company name on another piece of paper and tell yourself not to lose it (but you probably do).

Flash forward to the end of the day. You’re beat. But you still have your follow-up work to do, not to mention transcribing or filing all of those notes you jotted down and all of the business cards you gathered. You’ll be working at least until dinner, maybe even while you’re on the couch watching tube, too.

What all we RWs have in common is that we’re all spending a LOT of hours each day working in an environment that really isn’t ideal for getting work done. Car seats are cramped, steering wheels get in the way, and we’re always on the move. Not to mention our eating and drinking is funking up the place!

On top of that, there are the countless tasks we’re doing while we’re driving that require follow-up when we get home. Time we could be spending with our spouse, kids, and friends.

But who wants to live like this??
“Not I,” you say?
Reduce – don’t increase – your multitasking.

For about 30-or-so years, we’ve been compelled to juggle as many tasks as we could. The more the better, right? In fact, I can still remember many friends and colleagues bragging about how many balls they had in the air, like it was a badge of honor.

Multitasking requires being able to toggle in and out of tasks, picking up right where we had left off, and not failing any of those tasks. Unfortunately, most of us aren’t able to juggle that well; and in the past 5 years we’ve been seeing studies and articles proving this. I was never good at multitasking so this reverse trend is a welcome relief to me.

Multitasking doesn’t just include tasks; it also relates to thoughts. The more focus we have on our thoughts, our tasks, our conversations, our relationships, etc., the better we’ll cover each of those bases.

There’s a saying I learned in a leadership seminar awhile back. Before it was told to us, though, it was said to have been life-changing to many people. Well, I’m telling you the same thing now. It WAS life-changing for me and I hope it’ll resonate with you. The saying is:

“BE HERE NOW.”

In essence, when you’re with customers, vendors, and co-workers, be in the moment with them. When talking with one customer, don’t let your mind wander into thinking about your appointment right after that. Stay fully engaged with them. Stay in the moment.

And when you’re working, try not to spend too much time thinking about stuff outside of work – family, the softball game after work, your art class that night, etc.. When you’re with your family and friends after work, be with them
My-

So, where am I going with this?

One of the reasons why we RWs are challenged with our work-life balance is because we have so much unproductive time during the day while we’re driving. When we’re behind the wheel, we’re just not able to get much else done. The road requires our full attention. Sometimes (maybe a lot of times), we’ll just jam in key notes from meetings in the customer’s parking lot, and opt to take care of the rest of the followup when we get home. As I mentioned, going out for hunting is not easy.

Maybe you’re disciplined enough to carve out the time to ensure that at say, 6:30 pm, it’s time to sit down to dinner with your family and enjoy the rest of the night together. However, most of the heavy hitter outside sales reps I’ve known don’t do this well. While they’re with their spouse hanging out in the living room watching TV, they’ll also be on their laptop taking care of all of the things they weren’t able to get to during the day.

Sound familiar?

unavoidable – like when you have a big presentation lined up the next day and you want to make sure you’re ultra-prepared. And your wife is probably more than understanding in those cases. But if this is happening night-after-night, that understanding is sure to wane.unavoidable – like when you have a big presentation lined up the next day and you want to make sure you’re ultra-prepared. And your wife is probably more than understanding in those cases. But if this is happening night-after-night, that understanding is sure to wane.Alternatively, you can make your car a better place in which to get much more work done BEFORE you get home. So, in this respect, your UMO could give your marriage a jump start, as well.And if you’re not married, well, you’ll get more recreational time or time with others to enjoy. (Of course, this applies to the marrieds,too!)

Understanding about bitcoin and computer usage to get it

What Is A Bitcoin

Address?

Bitcoin is held in addresses, and transactions on the public ledger show BTC moving from one or more source addresses to one or more destination addresses. At first glance, each Bitcoin address seems like random numbers and letters in both upper and lowercase.

But don’t worry, you don’t need to memorize, recognize, or type these addresses. If you need to send bitcoin to someone, you will either click a link that has the recipient’s Bitcoin address (and sometimes the amount of BTC) embedded in it, scan a code that contains the destination address, or copy/paste the address into your Bitcoin wallet from an email, website, or other source.

If you ever find yourself manually typing a Bitcoin address into something… STOP. Something is wrong.

One comparison you will hear often is that a Bitcoin address is like a bank account number. I prefer to compare Bitcoin addresses to
reloadable Visa gift cards. Each card has its own number, and none of them has your name on it. You or someone else loads a card with dollars and you spend it wherever debit/credit cards are accepted.

Once you spend it all, you can either load that same card with more money and keep using it, or you can buy a new gift card with a different number and use that one instead. Now imagine you had a wallet full of these debit cards, and the ability to transfer money between them.

You go to the coffee shop and use Card #1 to buy a latte. The drink is $2.50, and the card has $25.00 on it. After the transaction, you move the remaining balance, $22.50, to Card #2.

Later on, you use Card #2 to buy a magazine for $15.00. After this transaction (or, with Bitcoin, as PART of the transaction) you put the remaining $7.50 onto Card #3. This chain of transactions continues until your balance reaches zero. This is how you use Bitcoin.

Each card is a Bitcoin address, and you manage the addresses with a Bitcoin wallet that allows you to make transactions and shift balances between them. Depending on the wallet, leftover funds from a transaction (the change) will return to the original Bitcoin address or be sent to a new address that is generated automatically.

What luallet should I use?

There are a lot of Bitcoin wTallets to choose from. Some platforms (such as Android) have more choices than others, but wallets for your smartphone have nearly identical feature sets. Desktop wallets some additional features, but tend not to be as user-friendly. I recommend a mobile wrallet for beginners. I am partial to Mycelium on Android and Breadwallet on iOS.

Electrum is a good desktop wallet. If you’re using another wrallet, make sure it is storing data and performing the transactions on your device, not just serving as a front-end to a wallet service based in the cloud.

If you’re not sure how to tell, here’s a hint: If you can go to a website and type a username and password to access your BTC outside of the app… don’t use that service. Avoid web-based wallets.

How to use Intel Chip to mine Bitcoin

What Is Mining?

What Is Mining?Eveiy computer that is properly connected to the Bitcoin network is a node. Nodes relay transactions, hold a full copy of the public ledger, and can also be used as Bitcoin wallets. But not every node is equal.Some members of the network are engaged in the crucial task of “confirming” or writing transactions to the ledger. These special nodes are called Miners.

The nature of the work theyare performing is both complex and difficult… so much so that it requires specialized hardware to perform efficiently. However, these miners aren’t performing this work out of the goodness of their hearts. The Bitcoin network compensates them in two ways for every block of transactions they write to the ledger:

1. They receive the transaction fees contained in that block of transactions

2. They receive a mining reward of 25 BTC. This amount goes down every few years, and will eventually reach zero, forcing miners to rely solely on transaction fees forincome.

Miners are competing with one another to confirm the next block of transactions. Since mining is so difficult, most miners join “pools” that combine their computing power and split any rewards they earn.

Can anyone mine? Is it profitable?

Technically, yes, anyone can mine. There is nothing stopping you from installing the Bitcoin software on your PC and joining the network as a miner. However, the likelihood of you mining a block (and getting the associated rewards) is vanishingly small. You’d essentially be wasting your time and electricity.


Why is this? The Bitcoin network is designed to confirm (or mine) a block of transactions every7 ten minutes on average. There is a certain amount of computing power required to make this happen… but if the mining power of the network exceeds that, then the difficulty of mining increases to compensate, thus maintaining the 10-minute average.

The more people mine, the harder mining becomes. In the early days, people could mine with the CPU in their desktop computers. As Bitcoin became more popular and more people started mining, the difficulty increased to the point that mining with CPUs became too hard. Then people Miners are competing with one another to confirm the next block of transactions. Since mining is so difficult, most miners join “pools” that combine their computing power and split any rewards they earn.

Can anyone mine? Is it profitable?

Technically, yes, anyone can mine. There is nothing stopping you from installing the Bitcoin software on your PC and joining the network as a miner. However, the likelihood of you mining a block (and getting the associated rewards) is vanishingly small. You’d essentially be wasting your time and electricity.

Why is this? The Bitcoin network is designed to confirm (or mine) a block of transactions every7 ten minutes on average. There is a certain amount of computing power required to make this happen… but if the mining power of the network exceeds that, then the difficulty of mining increases to compensate, thus maintaining the 10-minute average.

The more people mine, the harder mining becomes. In the early days, people could mine with the CPU in their desktop computers. As Bitcoin became more popular and more people started mining, the difficulty increased to the point that mining with CPUs became too hard. Then people started using their PC graphics cards (which are much more powerful) to earn the mining rewards. After that, companies began producing specialized hardware for mining.

Now we are at a point where there have been multiple generations of this specialized hardware, each much more powerful than the last. Yes, mining is still profitable, but unless you can afford to invest in expensive hardware and have a cheap (or free) source of electricity’, mining is not rewarding for the average person.

What about Cloud Mining? What is it and is it profitable?

Mining hardware is not only expensive, but it needs to be replaced with newer hardware often to keep up with the rising difficulty. Add to this the cost of electricity to run and cool the hardware. Most people can’t afford it.

But what if you could rent it?

At first glance, cloud mining seems like a great solution. Since you can’t afford all the mining hardware yourself, you contract with someone else who has some they’re willing to share. You lease their extra computing power and they run it for you at their facility, which is usually located somewhere where electricity is cheap. When the term of the lease (typically one year) is up, you can terminate the contract, continue it, or upgrade it so you have access to even more computing power. All the while, you are earning BTC with the computing power you leased.

Most people who get into these contracts fail to profit substantially (or at all). The cloud mining companies may be outright scams with no (or very little) actual hardware. Or the purchaser overestimates the amount of money they can earn with their leased equipment and ends up with little (or even negative) profit at the end of the term. Those that profit typically only do so due to the increase in the value of BTC over the lease term. If you’re going to profit from increasing value, you’d be better off just buying BTC on an exchange and holding it instead of investing in mining (cloud or otherwise).

So is it really too late to make good money mining Bitcoin?

If you don’t have access to serious start-up capital, Yes. BTC mining has evolved beyond the ability’ of most people to participate. It is an industry now, with startup costs worthy of that status.

What is bitcoin? Is it related to Intel?

What is bitcoin

Is it a currency? Is it a computer program?

Short answer: Bit coin is a way to send, receive, and store value on the internet without the involvement or permission of banks, payment processors, or other third parties. If you’re thinking this sounds a lot like cash, you’re right. Bitcoin is, among other things, cash for the internet.

Long Answer: When someone says the word “Bitcoin” they could be referring to one of several related concepts. Yes, Bitcoin (BTC) is a currency much like the US Dollar (USD) or the Euro (EUR). You can spend it. You can save it.

However, there are some interesting and substantial differences between Bitcoin and these other currencies, and we’ll discuss some of those throughout the book.
Bitcoin is also a method for tracking ownership of currency by updating globally distributed ledger. There’s a lot of meaning in that last sentence, so let’s break it down. If you have a bank account, the bank is keeping track of how much money you have in it. They keep the ledger. You’re probably keeping own ledger as well, but the bank has your money, so theirs is the one that matters in this example.

When you buy something for ten dollars with your debit card, your bank removes ten dollars from their ledger and the merchant’s bank adds ten dollars to theirs. Now imagine that instead of multiple banks with multiple ledgers, there was only one bank with one ledger. When you buy something, the one bank that both you and the merchant share updates its one ledger, showing that ten dollars have changed ownership from you to the merchant. Now erase the bank and replace it with a network of computers communicating over the internet. Instead of representing Dollars or Euros, values in the ledger are called bitcoins. That is the Bitcoin network.

Note: Since the same word refers to both the currency and the computer network, I will use “Bitcoin” (note the capital “B”) when referring
to the network, and “bitcoin” (lowercase) when talking about the unit of currency.

Also, the abbreviation “BTC” always refers to the currency, never to the network.

What Is The Blockchain?

The ledger mentioned above has a name: the Blockchain. The name comes from the way it is maintained. Transactions are not written individually, but in blocks or collections of many transactions. The Bitcoin blockchain is:

Complete. It contains every Bitcoin transaction ever made, all the way back to the very first one.

Unchangeable. I hesitate to use the word “impossible”, but it is extremely difficult to modify a Bitcoin transaction once it has been written to the ledger. Not only that, but every block of transactions makes harder to change the blocks that came before it. If a transaction has over six blocks written on top of it, it is essentially unchangeable.

Public. The Blockchain is not secret; anyone can view it and its contents online. Does this mean that people can view your Bitcoin transactions? Yes. You can look up any Bitcoin transaction (even ones that aren’t yours) and see related transactions which came before and after it.

However, the only information in the ledger is Bitcoin addresses (consider them to be like account numbers for now), transaction IDs, timestamps and amounts. You do not see names or items purchased. You do not see information that would allow you to assume someone’s identity or conduct transactions using their money.

You just see a record of BTC moving from one set of addresses to another.
Distributed. There isn’t just one copy of the Bitcoin ledger tucked away on a server. There are thousands of copies, each identical (and kept that way by the network).

Introduction: Bitcoin and Intel technology

Bitcoin: A Simple Introduction is an entry-level primer for new users. The intended audience for this book is someone who has just heard about Bitcoin and has only a vague (and perhaps flawed) notion of what it is. Maybe they heard about it from an excited friend who wants them to invest. Maybe they heard it from a customer that has asked them to start accepting Bitcoin for payment.

Maybe they saw a headline in a financial magazine or heard it in a keynote
speech at a conference. Or perhaps they saw a “Bitcoin” button as an option when buying something online. Wherever they came across it, Bitcoin is now in their circle of awareness. It is an itch that needs to be scratched. The flame of curiosity has been kindled and they want to know more.

Sadly, the first sources of information these people are likely to come across aren’t meant for them. They are meant for developers or academics or IT professionals. These books go into great detail about concepts that are both irrelevant and confusing to the average new user. There is nothing wrong with these books, but they are not what the new or perspective Bitcoin user needs. These people are not developers. They are not cryptographers. They don’t work in IT. To them, the words “private key” and “hard fork” are physical objects that have nothing to do with computers or software. And “hashrate” is just flat out gibberish.

The Bitcoin community goes out of its way to teach people new meanings for these words, and that is a mistake. People don’t want to learn a new language. They don’t want to learn about encryption or other concepts that have no point of reference in their everyday activities. They just want to know what all this “Bitcoin” fuss is about.

This book is for them.

It is not a detailed technical examination of code and concepts. Nor is it a step-by-step tutorial of how to back up a wallet or mine bitcoin. It is an explanation in everyday language of what Bitcoin is, how it works, and what makes it special. It contains no technical jargon. I avoid even the “correct” names for concepts if those names would be confusing or unfamiliar. For example, I use the phrase “public ledger” much more often than “Blockchain”, and refer to “hashrate” as “computing power” in the rare instances where I mention it at all. The words “cryptocurrency” and “private key” do not appear in this text outside of this introduction.

Yes, I over-simplify some concepts and ignore others if they are beyond what a new user needs to know or is likely to ask. I use some flawed but “accurate-enough” analogies and examples that may make experienced Bitcoin enthusiasts cringe.
All of this is intentional. Every improper term or contrived example is a decision made for the sake of simplicity.
Likewise, I kept the style of the book light and informal, with a question-and-answer format that is more appealing than the rigid format of a textbook. While this may invite people to skip to whatever question they have at the moment, but the book should be read from start to finish.
Some of the answers to questions later in the book expand on answers to earlier ones.
For the target audience: I hope you find this book useful and enjoyable. For the more experienced reader: I hope you remember what it was like to be a newbie and understand the trade-offs I’ve made. You may not be the target audience, but your boss, your lawyer, and the guy running the register at the coffee shop almost certainly are. I hope you find this book informative enough to consider buying them a copy.

Thank You In Advance For Reading.